Category Archives: Talks @ Concordia

Linguistics Colloquium: Todd Clary

Where/when: April 10 th,  4:15pm in H527 Abstract: Vedic √vŕ̥dh

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Linguistics Colloquium: Hannes A. Fellner The position of Tocharian in Indo-European: Evidence from nominal morphology

When: April 7th, 4:15pm, in H-527   Abstract: Fellner_Concordia_Abstract  

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Linguistics Colloquium: Michela Ippolito “How similar is similar enough?”

Time: 4:15 Where: 4:15 Abstract: In this talk I investigate the issue of the context-dependence of counterfactual conditionals and how the context constrains similarity in selecting the right set of worlds necessary in order to arrive at their correct truth-conditions. … Continue reading

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Colloquium: Dr. Sverre Stausland Johnsen on Vowel reduction in Old English and its origin in phonetic error

When: Friday February 13th 4:15pm Where: H-527   Abstract In Old English, an original unstressed long *’ō’ is in some morphological categories reflected as variation between ‘u’ and ‘a’. The traditional explanation for this variation is that *’ō’ generally developed … Continue reading

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Linguistics Colloquium: Jonathan Bobaljik

(Im)possible suppletive patterns The comparative and superlative corresponding to good are suppletive: better and best rather than hypothetical, but unacceptable, *gooder, *goodest. In a large, cross-linguistic survey of suppletion in adjectives (Bobaljik 2012), it turns out that some patterns of … Continue reading

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Cognitive Science Colloquium: Music, Speech and Sound in the Brain

Abstract: Since the time of Paul Broca, methods for looking at brain structure and brain function have become powerful tools to answer questions about cognition. In this talk, we will discuss how modern scientists use these tools, and the advantages … Continue reading

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LSA COLLOQUIUM 4: RAJ SINGH

  Abstract: One of the defining properties of presuppositions is that they are inferences that survive when a sentence is embedded under negation. For example, “John will bring his wetsuit” and “John won’t bring his wetsuit” both presuppose that John … Continue reading

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Public Lecture: CORE SOCIAL COGNITION; Dr. ELIZABETH SPELKE

Abstract: Mature human cognition is complex and variable, both across contemporary cultures and over human history, but human cognitive development proceeds in a more predictable pattern, especially in infants and young children. Studies of infants’ cognitive abilities in non-social domains … Continue reading

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Colloquium: An Introduction to Neuroscience For Cognitive Science Students

  The Concordia Linguistics Students Association (LSA) and the Concordia Centre for Cognitive Science  will host Dr. Mabel Chong (PhD McGill, 2009) for  an introductory-level  discussion of the neuroscience aspects of  Poeppel’s (2012) paper on the “the relation between the … Continue reading

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Colloquium 2: Laura Grestenberger

Abstract: Anagnostopoulou (2003) argues in her seminal paper “Participles and Voice” that the properties of Modern Greek and German participles are determined by different levels of incorporation of functional structure: in target state participles, the nominalizer attaches directly to the … Continue reading

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