Research Interests

Phonology, General linguistics, Historical linguistics, Cognitive Science

Academic Positions

Education

Research Projects / Grants / Awards

Books and Monographs

Articles and Chapters

  1. Symbol taxonomy in Biophonology. In press in Biolinguistic Investigations on the Language Faculty, ed. A.M. di Sciullo. John Benjamins. (with Camila Matamoros).
  2. Reduplication as projection. Accepted in Revue Roumaine de Linguistique. (with Marc Simpson).
  3. An I-Language Approach to Phonologization and Lexification. In Handbook of Historical Phonology, eds. Patrick Honeybone and Joseph Salmons. OUP. 2015 (with M. Kissock and M. Hale)
  4. Targeting underspecified segments: A formal analysis of feature changing and feature filling rules.(with Alan Bale and Maxime Papillon. Lingua 148:240-253. 2014.
  5. Rotuman 'phase' distinctions and the architecture of the grammar (with M. Kissock and M. Hale), a chapter in Phonology in the 2ist Century: In Honour ofGlyne Piggott, McGill, 2012 (published by McGill Linguistics online)
  6. Towards a bottom-up approach to phonological typology. 2012. In Towards a Biolinguistic Understanding of Grammar: Essays on Interfaces, ed. A.M. di Sciullo. John Benjamins. Pages 169-191.
  7. Intermodular explanation in cognitive science: An example from phonology. In Pylyshyn Papers, Don Dedrick and Lana Trick, eds. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 2009. 17pp.
  8. Finite State Machines in Phonology? In press in Phonological Theory: Representations and Architecture, C. Cairns and E. Raimy (eds.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 2009. 10pp.
  9. Constraining the Learning Path Without Constraints, or The OCP and NoBanana. In Rules, Constraints and Phonological Phenomena, A. Nevins & B. Vaux, (eds.) Oxford University Press. 2008.
  10. Computing Long-distance Dependencies in Vowel Harmony Biolinguistics 1:28-48 (with F. Mailhot.) Nov. 2007.
  11. Microvariation, Variation, and the Features of Universal Grammar. Lingua 117.4. 2007. With Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock.
  12. Introduction. In Ramchand & Reiss (see above). 2007. (with Gillian Ramchand.)
  13. Modularity in the 'sound' domain. In Ramchand & Reiss (see above). 2007.
  14. Vowel Harmony. Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Ed. Keith Brown. Elsevier. 2006.
  15. Subgrouping. Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Ed. Keith Brown. Elsevier. 2006.
  16. Analogy. Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Ed. Keith Brown. Elsevier. 2006.
  17. Natural classes. Encyclopedia of Linguistics. Ed. Philipp Strazny. New York: Routledge,2005.
  18. Rules and constraints. Encyclopedia of Linguistics. Ed. Philip Strazny. New York: Routledge,2005.
  19. Romance and something else. Romance Language and Linguistics Theory 2002: 141-162. Edited by R. Bok-Bennema et al.
  20. Accepting markednesslessness. Proceedings of Berkeley Linguistics Society 29. Berkeley Linguistics Society : Proceedings of the Annual Meeting: General session and parasession on phonetics sources of phonological patterns : Synchronic and diachronic explanations (February 14-17, 2003): 569-581. 2003.
  21. The subset principle in phonology: Why the tabula can't be rasa (with Mark Hale). Journal of Linguistics 39: 219-244. 2003.
  22. Deriving the feature-filling / feature-changing contrast: An application to Hungarian vowel harmony. Linguistic Inquiry. 34:199-224. 2003.
  23. Towards a theory of fundamental phonological relations. In AM di Sciullo (ed.), Asymmetry in Grammar, Volume 2: Morphology, phonology, acquisition. John Benjamins Press, 221-244. 2003.
  24. Language change without constraint reranking. E. Holt, Optimality Theory and Language Change. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 2003.
  25. Quantification in Structural Descriptions:Attested and Unattested Patterns The Linguistic Review 20. 2003.
  26. L2 Evidence for the Structure of the L1 Lexicon. 2001.  International Journal of English Studies 1: 219-239.
  27. Optimality Theory from a Cognitive Science Perspective. The Linguistic Review 17 (2000), 291-301.
  28. Phonology as cognition (with Mark Hale). In Phonological Knowledge: Conceptual and Empirical Issues, N. Burton-Roberts, Philip Carr & Gerard Docherty, eds. Oxford University Press. pp. 161-184.
  29. Substance abuse and dysfunctionalism: Current trends in phonology (with Mark Hale). Linguistic Inquiry 31: 157-169 (2000).
  30. Towards an explanation of analogy. Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph: Indo-European Perspectives (2000).
  31. Evaluating the Empirical Basis for Output-Output Correspondence (with Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock), in the Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society 23: 137-147, UC-Berkeley (2000).
  32. Formal and Empirical Arguments concerning Phonological Acquisition (with Mark Hale), Linguistic Inquiry 29:656-683 (1998).
  33. Phonological Underspecification & the Subset Principle (with Mark Hale). Proceedings of the Western Conference on Linguistics, UC-Santa Cruz (1996).
  34. What is Output? Output-Output Correspondence in OT Phonology (with Madelyn Kissock and Mark Hale), Proceedings of West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics XVI, CSLI Publications/Cambridge University Press (1997).
  35. What an OT Parser Tells Us about the Initial State of the Grammar (with Mark Hale), in A. Sorace, C. Heycock and R. Shillcock (eds.), Proceedings of the GALA '97 Conference on Language Acquisition, 352-357. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh (1997).
  36. How To Parse and How Not To (with Mark Hale), Proceedings of the Northeast Linguistics Society 27:159-170 (1997).
  37. The origin of the nn/ð alternation in Old Icelandic. North West European Language Evolution 30:135-158 (1997).
  38. Evidence in Phonological Acquisition: Implications for the Initial Ranking of Faithfulness Constraints (with Mark Hale), Proceedings of the 28th Annual Child Language Research Forum, Eve V. Clark (ed.), pp. 143-152. Cambridge University Press (1997).
  39. Unifying the Interpretation of Structural Descriptions. Proceedings of West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics XV:413-428, CSLI Publications/Cambridge University Press (1997).
  40. Deriving an Implicational Universal in a Constrained OT Grammar, Proceedings of Northeast Linguistics Society 26: 303-17. UMass Graduate Linguistics Association, Amherst (1996).
  41. The outcome of /lr/ and /nr/ in Old Icelandic. The Linguistic Review 11:329-350 (1994).

Published Reviews

Working Papers / Technical Reports / Software

Invited Academic Lectures

  1. Sometimes a sonorant is just a sonorant. Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop. UQAM. April 2017.
  2. Applying basic set theory in phonology. Carleton Institute for Cognitive Science. Oct. 2013.
  3. Innateness of Primitives. Carleton Institute for Cognitive Science. Oct. 2013.
  4. Linguistic Argumentation and the Empirical Basis of Universal Grammar. Philopolis Montreal. 2013.
  5. I-language typology and the combinatorics of phonological systems. Colloque du Réseau Français de Phonologie. June 2012. Paris.
  6. Implications of underspecfication for phonological typology: How to get 7 trillion grammars for nothing. Williams College Program in Cognitive Science. February 2011.
  7. Abstracting from the welter: How to get 7 trillion grammars for nothing. Language Design Conference, UQAM, May 2010.
  8. Chomskyan Linguistics and some -isms of cognitive science. Williams College Program in Cognitive Science. April 2010. With Dana Isac.
  9. Language and Cognition: Approaches to Universal Grammar. Carleton University Program in Cognitive Science. March 2010.
  10. Some substance-free phonology. University of Maryland, October 2009.
  11. Linguistics as Cognitive Science. University of New Brunswick at St. John. October 2009. With dana Isac.
  12. Cognitive Science at Concordia. Cognitio 2009. UQAM.
  13. Modeling "backcopying" derivationally. Harvard, April 2009. With Marc Simpson.
  14. Formal phonology. FONHISPANIA 2009, Madrid
  15. I-Modularity and some -isms of cognitive science. University of Bucharest, 2008.
  16. Phonological facts. University of Bucharest, 2008.
  17. Phonological Acquisition and the Logic of Innateness. University of Bucharest, 2008.
  18. Relating some -isms of cognitive science. Cognitive Science Speaker Series at York University. March 2008.
  19. Linguistics for medical personnel. SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Infectious Diseases Unit. October 2007.
  20. Vowel Harmony: Phonetic, Phonological and Computational Issues. CUNY Graduate Center. October 2007.
  21. A Cellular Automaton Implementation of Vowel Harmony. Concordia Linguistics Students Association. Sep. 21, 2007.
  22. Linguistics as cognitive ethology. Science Today Lecture Series. SUNY Oswego. April 2007
  23. Phonological Acquisition and Phonological Change. International Conference on Historical Linguistics Montreal. August, 2007.
  24. Adjacency as a long-distance relation. Precedence relations in phonology. CUNY Graduate Center. January 2007.
  25. Chomsky's Syntactic Structures. Cognition Seminar. Concordia Psychology Dept. Nov. 6, 2006.
  26. La nécessité logique de la Grammaire Universelle. Université de Sherbrooke. April 2006.
  27. What is a phonological fact? The 13th Manchester Phonology Meeting. University of Manchester, May 2005.
  28. Phonology as cognitive science. Zenon Pylyshyn Conference. University of Guelph, 2005.
  29. Formal Phonology. 13th Conference of the Student Organisation of Linguistics in Europe (ConSOLE XIII). Tromsø, Norway. December, 2004.
  30. Intermodular explanation in cognitive science: An example from phonology. Concordia Cognitive Science Group. Nov. 2004.
  31. Discussant at Symposium on Phonological Theory: Representations and Architecture. CUNY Graduate Center. February, 2004.
  32. Some issues in substance free phonology. Computational Linguistics at Concordia (CLaC) Research Group. November, 2003.
  33. Phonology and the study of cognition. Concordia Linguistics students Association Colloquium Series. Oct., 2003.
  34. Accepting markednesslessness. Berkeley Linguistics Society Parasession on Phonetics and Phonology. February, 2003.
  35. Grammar as computation. Guest lecture in course Language and Brain, Roberto de Almeida, professor. Concordia University, Science College. January, 2003.
  36. Subsumption and Distinctness in the Phonology of the Extended Baboon.  UQAM. October 2002.
  37. La phonologie sans la phonétique. Université Laval. October 2002.
  38. Quantification and  Substance-free Phonology. Kansas University. April 16, 2002.
  39. Universaux Sonores et universaux phonologiques. III-ème Journées d'Études Linguistiques. March 21-23, 2002. Nantes, France.
  40. The Phonetics and Phonology of the Extended Baboon. Ohio State University.  February 28, 2002.
  41. The OCP and NoBanana.  Ohio State University.  March 1, 2002.
  42. Perceptual magnets and  phonological features. Workshop on early phonological acquisition,  Carry-le-Rouet, France. October, 2001 (with Mark Hale).
  43. OT and phonological acquisition: An evaluation. Workshop on early phonological acquisition,  Carry-le-Rouet, France. October, 2001.
  44. Specificity in representations. Linguistics Department, Harvard University. April, 2001.
  45. Mentalism, nativism and constructivism--linguistic evidence. Guest lecture in Cognition II, Concordia University Psychology Department. March 2001.
  46. Issues in Phonological Theory and Phonological Acquisition. Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, EHESS-CNRS Paris. February, 2001.
  47. The innateness hypothesis isn't a hypothesis. Linguistics Department, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. December, 2000.
  48. Quantification and identity references in phonology: A case study in Universal Grammar. Linguistics Department, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. December, 2000.
  49. The implications of a theory of indices and identity in phonology. Linguistics Program Phonology Circle, MIT. November, 2000.
  50. Morphological Musings. McGill Syntax and Semantics Group. February 2000.
  51. Ambiguity and vagueness. Project on asymmetry, UQAM. February 2000.
  52. Against Constraints. McGill Linguistics Department Invited Speaker Series. November 1999.
  53. Acquisition and Post-OT Phonology. Phonology 2000: A Symposium. MIT and Harvard. May 1999.
  54. Some more misconceptions concerning Optimality Theory. UC Berkeley. May 1998.
  55. Analogy and Linguistic Theory. Départment de Linguistique. Université de Québec à Montréal. March 1998.
  56. The Logical Necessity of Universal Grammar: Implications for the Acquisition of Phonology. Concordia Linguistics Colloquium Series. March 1998.
  57. UG and the phonological learning path. Program in Linguistics, University of California, Davis. February, 1998.
  58. Learnability and Acquisition. Panel discussion on phonological acquisition. Montréal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Conference, University of Ottawa, February 1998.
  59. How (and Whether) to Acquire an OT Grammar, Université de Montréal / Cercle Linguistique de Montréal (December 1997).
  60. Analogy and Optimality Theory. Concordia Linguistics and Modern Languages Student Association Colloquium Series. November 1997.
  61. Phonological acquisition and phonological theory, University of California, Berkeley, Linguistics Department (1997).
  62. Does Phonology Need Output-Output Correspondence? (with Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock) Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop, University of Toronto (1997).
  63. Learnability and Representational UG, Stanford Phonology Workshop (1997).
  64. Representational UG and the Learnability of Underlying Forms, University of Toronto Linguistics Department (1996).
  65. Topics in the acquisition of phonology, University of Connecticut Linguistics Department (1996).
  66. The subset principle and the acquisition of the phonological inventory, Linguistics Department, California State University, Fresno (1996).
  67. A UG Interpretive Procedure for Structural Descriptions, Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop, McGill University (1996).
  68. Phonological acquisition and phonological change, Harvard Symposium on Linguistic Change (1995).

Conference Presentations

  1. Recognizing Intrasegmental Coarticulation. Répresentations Cognitives, Journée Montréalaise des Sciences Cognitives. May 2017. UQAM. With Veno Volenec.
  2. Geminates and Vowel Laxing in Québec French. LSRL 47, 2017. University of Delaware. With Anaele Cuerrier.
  3. Symbol taxonomy in biophonology. Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop. 2015. UT. With Camila Matamoros.
  4. Precedence-Based tonal representation. Hong Kong Uiversity tone Conference. 2015. With David Ta-Chun Shen.
  5. Contour spread: Encoding Precedence in Tonal Representation and Beyond. Penn Linguistics Colloquium 39. 2015. With David Ta-Chun Shen.
  6. Two Applications of Precedence-Based Phonology. Penn Linguistics Colloquium 39. 2015. With David Ta-Chun Shen.
  7. Variables and Other Biolinguistic Issues in Phonology. Biolinguistic Investigations on the Language Faculty. Pavia, Italy. 2015. With Camila Matamoros.
  8. Sets of features vs. sets of sets of features: A notational innovation for phonological rules. Poster at Manchester Phonology Workshop 21. University of Manchester, May, 2013. With Alan Bale and Maxime Papillon.
  9. Targeting Underspecified Segments. Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop. March, 2013. University of Ottawa. With Alan Bale and Maxime Papillon.
  10. “Ternarity can no longer be taboo”: Underspecification and “stripped-down” UG. Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Boston. (Poster). January 2013.
  11. Approaching Phonological Typology from Below. Theoretical Linguistics Conference. University of Bucharest. June 2011.
  12. Computing partial identity: Why NoGem is insufficient. 8th Old World Conference in Phonology, Marrakech, January 2011. With Hisako Noguchi.
  13. Arbitrariness and the determination of identity. NAPhC6, Concordia University. 2010. With Allison Cameron & Hisako Noguchi.
  14. Feature-Changing Rules are Necessary. MOT 2010, Carleton University. With Oriana Kilbourn-Ceron and Eric Iacono.
  15. A Recursive Projection Model of Reduplication. Recursion: Structural Complexity in Language and Cognition, UMASS, May 26-28, 2009. Poster. With Marc Simpson.
  16. Reduplication and linearization. Manchester Phonology Workshop 17. University of Manchester, May, 2009. Poster. With Marc Simpson.
  17. Reduplication as iterated projection. GLOW 32, Nantes. With Marc Simpson.
  18. Reduplication as iterated projection. MOT 2009, Toronto. Poster. With Marc Simpson.
  19. Projection feet in reduplication. CUNY Phonology Forum Conference on the Foot, 2009. With Marc Simpson.
  20. Categorical skepticism concerning gradience in Hungarian harmonic and disharmonic root vowels. GLOW 2008 Workshop on categorical phonology and gradient facts, March, 2008. Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK. With Michael Gagnon, Linnaea Stockall & Alexis Wellwood.
  21. The Georgian Lateral Fronting Experiment as a Basis for Rejecting Minimally Specified Rule Formulation, Montréal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Conference, McGill University, March, 2008. With Anna Chigogidze.
  22. Modeling Phonological Rules with Simple Programs. New Kind of Science 2007 Poster presentation. 2007. UVM.
  23. Scientific Inquiry Beyond the Core Sciences. The Spirit of Inquiry Conference, Concordia University. May 2007. With M. Gagnon, D. Isac and H. Noguchi.
  24. Epistemological Remarks on Universal Grammar. With Roberto de Almeida, Mark Hale, Daniela Isac. Biolinguistic Investigations. Santo Domingo, DR, 2007.
  25. Against logophoric reflexives in picture NPs. Interface legibility at the edge. Bucharest. June 2006. With Daniela Isac.
  26. What is phonology? Fourth North American Phonology Conference. May 2006. With Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock.
  27. Underspecification, Markedness and the Acquisition Process. 6e Journées Internationales du Réseau Français de Phonologie. Orléans. June 2004. With Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock.
  28. Qu'est-ce qu'une règle possible en phonologie? Colloque sure Fondements relationnels du traitement des langues naturelles. ACFAS 2004. UQAM. With Fred Mailhot.
  29. On the form and interpretation of phonological rules. 2004 Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop. February 2004. With Fred Mailhot.
  30. Immediate constituent analysis in auditory perception: Implications for phonological theory. Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting 2004, Boston.
  31. Precedence and locality in vowel harmony. Approaching Asymmetry at the Interfaces, UQAM, Oct. 2003. With Fred Mailhot.
  32. Universal core syllabification and sonority hierarchy are unnecessary. Les 5emes Colloques du GDR Phonologie, June 2-4, 2003. Montpellier, France.
  33. Anti-antigemination: syncope and epenthesis in Telugu. The 11th Manchester Phonology Meeting, May 2003. University of Manchester, England. With Madelyn Kissock.
  34. Individuals, Properties, and something else. La Représentation du Sens. May 2003. UQAM. With Daniela Isac.
  35. A partitive analysis of else. LSA 2003. With Daniela Isac.
  36. Stressmatica Stress Generator. LSA 2003. With Sungwon Koo.
  37. Romance and something else. Going Romance 16. Groningen, 2002. With Daniela Isac.
  38. Something else on something else. Northeast Linguistics Society 33, MIT (with Daniela Isac). November, 2002.
  39. Phonological accounts of microvariation in pronunciation. GLOW 25. Amsterdam (with Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock). 2002.
  40. Constraining the learning path without constraints.  3rd International  Meeting of the Phonology GDR (CNRS). May-June, 2001. Nantes, France.
  41. Rich specification at the initial state. 9th Manchester Phonology Meeting.May 2001. University of Manchester, England. [poster]
  42. Towards a theory of fundamental phonological relations. Asymmetry Conference. UQAM. May, 2001.
  43. Interpreting structural descriptions. Acme Balkanica Conference. Concordia University. April 2001.
  44. Homophony and the structure of the lexicon. 2nd International Conference on the Mental Lexicon. Montréal. October 18-20, 2000. [poster].
  45. Quantification and identity references in phonological processes. Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, 2001. Washington, DC.
  46. Possible and Impossible Conditions on Rules. 4th Utrecht Biannual Phonology Workshop: Typology in phonology. Utrecht, The Netherlands. June 22-23, 2000.
  47. Quantification in phonological rules. Les Journées de Phonétique. Université du Québec à Montréal, May 13-14, 2000.
  48. Tonal patterns in Fongbe (with Andrea Gormley). Les Journées de Phonétique, Université du Québec à Montréal, May 13-14, 2000.
  49. Homophony. Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Workshop. University of Toronto and York University. February 2000.
  50. Should Output-Output Correspondence be Invoked to Account for Analogy? Xth Conference of Nordic and General Linguistics, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 1998.
  51. Grammar Optimization (with Mark Hale), Xth Conference of Nordic and General Linguistics, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 1998.
  52. Substance abuse and dysfunctionalism: Current trends in phonology (with Mark Hale), Montréal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Conference, University of Ottawa, February 1998.
  53. Explaining Analogy (with Mark Hale), Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, 1998, New York.
  54. What an OT Parser tells us about the Initial State of the Grammar (with Mark Hale), GALA '97, Language Acquisition: Knowledge Representation and Processing, Edinburgh, Scotland, April 1997 [poster].
  55. What is Output? Output-output Correspondence in Optimality Phonology (with Madelyn Kissock and Mark Hale), West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics XVI, Seattle, February 1997.
  56. Evaluating the Empirical Basis for Output-Output Correspondence (with Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock), Berkeley Linguistic Society 23, Berkeley, February 1997.
  57. Empirical Evidence and Output-output Correspondence in Optimality Theory (with Mark Hale and Madelyn Kissock),Montréal-Ottawa-Toronto Phonology Conference, Toronto, February 1997.
  58. Phonological Underspecification & the Subset Principle (with Mark Hale),Western States Conference on Linguistics, Santa Cruz, October 1996.
  59. How To Parse and How Not To in OT Phonology (with Mark Hale), Northeast Linguistics Society 27, McGill University, Montréal, October 1996.
  60. The Comprehension-Production Dilemma in Child Language (with Mark Hale), What Children Have to Say About Linguistic Theory (WCHSALT), Utrecht, The Netherlands, June 1996.
  61. The Subset Principle in Phonological Acquisition (with Mark Hale), Formal Linguistic Society of Mid-America, Ohio State University, May 1996.
  62. Phonological Acquisition and the Initial Ranking of Faithfulness Constraints (with Mark Hale), 28th Annual Child Language Research Forum, Stanford, April 1996 [poster].
  63. Underspecification and Natural Classes, West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics at UC Irvine (1996).
  64. Deriving an Implicational Universal in Two Theories of Phonology, Northeast Linguistics Society 26 at Harvard/MIT, Cambridge, MA. (1995).
  65. Lexical and Phonological Allomorphy Northeast Linguistics Society 26 (IE workshop) at Harvard/MIT, Cambridge, MA. (1995).
  66. Stepwise assimilation and optimality theory, The Derivational Residue in Phonology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands. (1995).
  67. A rule ordering paradox in Old Icelandic (with Madelyn Kissock), East Coast Indo-European Conference XIV, Harvard University (1995).
  68. Sources of phonological rules, Linguistic Society of America, Boston, MA. (1994).
  69. Relative clauses in Old Icelandic and Germanic (with Madelyn Kissock), East Coast Indo-European Conference XII, Cornell University, Ithaca (1993).
  70. Old Icelandic maðr: Sound change or analogy? East Coast Indo-European Conference XII, Cornell University, Ithaca (1993).
  71. Syllable structure conditions on assimilation, Comparative Germanic Syntax Workshop 8, University of Tromsø, Norway. (1992).
  72. Root Allomorphy, University of California Third Annual Indo-European Conference (1990).

Other Professional Activities

Courses Taught

Concordia University

University of the Basque Country, Gasteiz

Carleton University EGG Summer School in Generative Linguistics (Debrecen, Lublin, Constanța Clinton County Correctional Facility, Dannemora NY

McGill University Boston University Harvard University Brandeis University

Contact

Charles Reiss
Linguistics Program
Concordia University
H663	
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd., W.
Montréal, Québec
H3G 1M8 Canada
(514) 848-2424 x2310 (office)
(514) 848-2424 x8679 (fax)
charles.reiss(at)concordia(dot)ca